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on the new collaborative economy. we're interested in it because it has aspects that have piqued our interest, about hoour environment, how to improve life for more people, how to make an expensive city more affordable to more people, how to utilize the strengths of the city as a great tourist city. how we can get more folks to come and experience the wonders of the city. maybe they will make their stake here. these panel members have decided to make their stake here. they risked reputation, may be small amounts of money. if they had a lot of money, they may not have had to start this. they have also done it for the right reasons. they want to experience the city in a different way, but one that is in the tradition of san francisco and is reflective of mine, welcoming more people to share in the economy. hopefully the right reasons will create more jobs and get more entrepreneurs involved. i have often said this can be the city for the 100%. everybody can have a chance to fulfill their dreams and make sure they can have a stable income for themselves and their families. i think we are on the
. this is what brought me to the sharing economy. what i was after was a new way to live in a way that i felt i could live fully. what excites me about sharing is how it changes every day like for the better. it empowers us. the economic shift in the new businesses of creating and exchanging value is creating a new cultural narrative. it is replacing an old legacy narrative that was toxic. it told us the go live comes from shopping and competition -- it told us the good life comes from shopping in competition, from being free from each other. we are leading ving this because it has pushed us to the brink of extinction. it has enslaved as to debt. it is boring. it is spiritually empty. there is a news story being born in san francisco. it is one where the more you contribute to the common good, the more you are respected. the better you believe in committee, the more access to what you have -- the better you behave in a community, the more access you have. instead of judging each other, we help each other and realize our greatest potential. we open our world to each other. through doing that, we
to travel, but also access to the tourism economy that flourishes in the city. >> i just want to address the technology point really quickly. we try and emphasize the human aspect of this, whether it is on the website or whether it is through the iphone app. other people use a device that we built, that lets you share a car more conveniently by letting the richer unlock the car with their smartphone. even with that, we really try to connect the people who are sharing because a lot of people to accept rentals just with the kit and may never meet the people they are sharing with. we tried to encourage the parties to get to know each other, trying to just display your interest or so many things i can think of that our websites due to show who this person really is. they take their photo. i think part of this is about trust, and it is about letting -- the things we do to encourage trust and the things you do as a responsible member of the sharing community to insure you are doing your due diligence as well. when two people -- first off, the one example i want to bring is that a lot of our ca
and creation of new jobs, whether it is in a high-tech economy with twitter and other types of work force issues moving forward and businesses moving forward to creation of construction that local residents have a good shot at jobs. the john avalos local hiring measure was important in making sure we get residents, but even in my district, there are pockets of poverty and many people out of work. supporting those unemployed and underemployed people, supporting struggling small businesses in a difficult economy, and i support the small businesses versus more chain stores that seem to be coming into the store fronts, but i try to be sympathetic to local businesses because they make up the diversity of our local neighborhoods. those are some of the challenges that face our businesses. >> are there other issues specific to your district? how do you balance the needs of the issues in your district against the needs of the city as a whole? >> i know that our district has a higher proportion of seniors than some other district, and there is a brand new senior complex and wraparound community ser
," and we're here because we live in a global cloueconomy. it has altered local economies because so many manufacturing and technology jobs are moving, whether it is a matter of costs for going where the trained work force is. we're fortunate to have to governors here to talk about how that change affects their jobs and what they're doing to jump- start their economies which compete with one another. this could be fun. let me start with our guest. governor hickenlooper. i knew that was going to happen. most of us here are pretty much aware of california's budget crisis. can you give us a quick briefing on where colorado is and what you are trying to do to turn things around? >> our budget is just as dressed as almost every state in the country. we have been working trying to control costs, get our pension funds in line, our state employees have not had a raise in four years. it has been difficult all the way around. the real challenge has been to try and turn public sentiment and get people to recognize it without a strong economy. it will not solve any of these problems. we have been rel
economy here in san francisco and as i do that, i always have to think about what to say that mary hasn't already said about it. and if you look at the real estate economy generally in our nation, and the fact that it is still soft. that we still need more jobs. that there is a recovery, but it's a slow recovery. you can't do that without thinking gee, will i sound like a politician for one or the other major political parties? and so i will steer clear of that and focus instead on san francisco and maybe we're living in a bubble, but it's a pretty wonderful bubble to be living in. the real question is the resurgence of real estate we're seeing now, is that sustained growth? is that just, you know, for the moment? but as i look at it, we're putting in place an awful lot of things that shape what our city looks like in the future, how our city operates, how we interact with our city. as i started to think about that, i thought, you know, the number of major infrastructure projects going on in our immediate region now are probably -- there are probably more dollars and energy going int
the governments and the companies between the two sides. as the largest economy in the u.s., california boasts the resources and a strong advantage in high tech, bio-science, agriculture, fisheries, and the forestry, and even tourism. and in terms of cooperation with china, california enjoys exceptional economic, cultural, and geographical locations and advantages. it is always is the gateway of the united states to china. as the economic and trade cooperation between china and the united states and california deepens, now we believe that trade and investment keeps growing. china is the third largest export destination for california. many multinationals like hp, intel, cisco, and chevron are doing well in china. they're making money in china. at the same time, as the close relationship is going on, many chinese companies are working in san francisco in california. i would like to name a few. the tsl, ciuts, just to name a few. these are successful chinese companies working here. as the american companies in china, the chinese companies working in california in san francisco are also making co
of the san francisco economy 80% of our economy is small business along our commercial corridors and most jobs are created by small businesses each year. the city needs to reorient its economic polices towards small businesses and start to remove the red tape and stream-lining the permitting process and other ways to facilitate small businesses to thrive and survive in san francisco. so my no. 1 priority is reorienting our economic polices away from the cronyism, the power elect elite and back to the small businesses. >> i was born and raised in the district. that is not why i think you should vote for me as your supervisor. my entire life was been committed to this district starting when i worked for the mayor where women were trained i know what good social services look like, but i understand that we can't exclude people because they are rich. we can't exclude people because they are middle-class at the expense of making sure we're taking care of one class of people. i worked really hard and there were a lot of people that helped me become the person who i am. sadly, my brother did n
's how we build the local economy with small business. >> all right. mr. garcia. >> joe is right. we need to change the landscape and how we do business. we have decided that process is product here in san francisco. we tend to defy the code and vilify the individual who is trying to get a business started. we are not business friendly. in 2004 the city of san francisco passed prop i and required that the city do economic analysis every four years and strategy report. talks about how we improve the economy and one thing we are trying to change to the gross receipt tax and that is a start but we have to press this and business friendly city and benefit those in business and benefit those in need of job when is we have 8% unemployment here in san francisco. >> thank you sir. ms. gavin. >> i would invest in transportation, in public transportation it would be muni. i think a lot of areas that we need to upgrade muni and put it under ground. i would invest in the ferries. i think being a tourist city and many people commute to the city i think it's one area a lot of jobs would com
sharing, scooter sharing is the latest contribution for people having access in our economy rather than just offered ownership and to me, that's really what wha* the shared economy is about and this great incubating idea of scooter sharing is wonderfulfinger these are all electric, you can power this up on 18 cents worth of power as compared to what gasoline prices are. it takes, if you want to go around the city at 30 miles an hour, it will be less than half of the power of a toaster. it's equivalent to 850 miles a gallon to be on one of these electric scooters. i think it's safe, obviously we're going train people in the right way to abide but all the traffic regulations that we have, but as i sit in my car on days where i have to wait and 7, watch these scooters go by, it's kind of like where am i and what am i doing and can i contribute even more, so it's exciting to see this happen in san francisco, to see its launch, it's exciting that it's an idea that incubated out of the hub, it's exciting to not only see that it's fun for people to get around, to be more efficient and to kind
economies to fwroe and our dialog in our country is the urban cities that have to create the new jobs for the new economy. i know paris must do so as well, and if we work tokt, we can create those and instigate and innovate our new ideas for the new economy and our mutual obligations on the environment, and then there is something that paris and san francisco hold very dearly and that's an ongoing conversation about our human rights as world leaders, so it's human rights, it's the environment, it's the economy and these are the reasons why we hold our relationship with paris and with all the other great cities of the world in a sister city relationship so dearly, we learn from each other, we send delegations to each other, we welcome each other to the city but in each and every instance, we are always thinking about ideas about how we can help each other and help regions improve, so i am excited to have met with the mayor just a few minutes ago to reaffirm our relationship and we'll sign that in a few moments to document that and to promise each other that we will continue this very
track? what would you like to change about the city's approach to developing economies? >> in the chair of the land use committee this year, and i was vice chair last year with our former chair from the bayview hunters point area. i guess i approach land use and economic development from a different perspective. i'm not against development, but i want it to be equitable so we look at the lowest income populations or even middle income populations so that residents have a strong say as development moves forward, whether it is the park ridge said development in the southern, western part of the city or even treasure island with there's many low-income families that currently live there. but it is a strong voice for the residents that currently are there. we also want to see new people moving into the city, and hopefully, we focus also on families and housing that provides better homes and home opportunities for families, but i always say that i support equitable development. i also do feel that big business and downtown interests usually dominate the discussion on development. i want to s
business. >> okay. the resulting economy has resulted in internet base for short term rentals and many of the rentals are illegal and the hotel tax is not collected. should the city legalize some or all of the arrangements and collect a hotel tax and we will begin with you -- i will be glad to repeat the question. >> i honestly don't know how you would enforce a law like that. of course everyone should pay their fair share but i don't know how you could enforce that. i believe we should standardize the inlaw units, maybe sure they're up to code and regulate any new units but as far as taxation i cannot see how you could actually enforce that and collect the taxes on it. >> thank you sir. mr. yee. >> cheryl i just want to make sure -- >> i can repeat it. there is internet base market for short base rentals and they sublease units to visitors and tourists and many are illegal and the city's hotel tax is not collected. should the city legalize these arrangements and collect the hotel tax? >> i traveled to different countries and i go to the internet and they have hotels and these renta
-- supporting our economy in the bay area. thank you to mayor lee and his leadership in making sure we continue to support local businesses in many of our projects. thank you very much. congratulations. and i know there are many more projects to come. thank you. [applause] >> hollande to do a great shout out to the recreation park department two superintendents -- i want to do a shout out. one is in charge of parks, one recreation. they keep this facility clean, safe, beautiful, and funding. ann and -- anna and bob. they're both here. [applause] last year, the mayor led the effort to rename the chinese recreation center in honor of one of the city's own and a national heroine. betty ann ong was a flight attendant on american airlines flight 11 on september 11, two thousand one. her quick-thinking and brave actions during the fight -- flight probably saved thousands of additional lives. harry ong, her brother, is here on behalf of ong family and their foundation which is been jitters and heartfelt in raising funds to furnish this new -- which has been so generous and heartfelt and raising funds
colleague scott wiener for helping to showcase the importance of the other nine to five economy. the impact of all that you do has an impact on our job situation and local economy, and to highlight all of the great work that we can do together to ensure that the sectors that you all represent, the sectors that you work for, that you employ people for connaught is one of the greatest sectors in san francisco. i hope we will take the opportunity of the america's cup to showcase our clubs, our restaurants, our nightlife events. as someone who represents the broadaway neighborhood, an area of town that i used to spend a lot of time in when i was in my 20's -- but actually, very few locals take the time to head to the beach on broadway. our neighborhoods are coming together to say that broadway is open to the rest of the world as well as san francisco. i want to put san francisco back on the map when it comes to music. to make sure that we have the type of entertainment that we used to be renowned for. and those of you that work in our bars and clubs, i want to make sure that we are trading the
compromise is to repatriate all those overseas profit corporations are not putting back into our or economy. the largest beneficiary would be california. we want to see what the cutting edge is. most of a still look for california. -- loomost of us still look to california. what governor brown said about the traditional politics is all about taking the thing in making it fresh. to a certain extent, i tried to be a writer in college. i failed miserably. a professor said everything has been set but not everything has been said superbly. even if it had, everything must be said freshly again and again. you have to see a fresh lead to a certain extent. the real issue with -- in terms of asking the president, what are the things that matter most, a bass part of those profits would be invested in california. colorado would have a significant -- pretty much every state in the country would benefit. you look at the companies based in silicon valley. they have offices, you want to expand your business, think about those young people in colorado. everything -- stated say the same thing. that money wou
, the broader u.s. economy does move forward? if we can get the u.s. economy out of second gear, we have seen the broader housing market turn and we're beginning to see the foundations of some job-growth. if the economy can pick up more broadly, what that would mean for san francisco, given the foundation that we have set for us today? clearly looking forward we think the physical boundaries of what is downtown will change. the type of space the tenants want will change. we think that this is a very good time for san francisco. we live in an exceptional time. and i'm going to paraphrase ever so slightly, but as jerry speyer would say, don't screw it up. [ laughter ] i feel very fortunate to work in this environment, to work for a great company and most importantly to get to work with all of you everyday. thank you very much. [ applause ] >> thank you, carl. now we're going to move from the talk about the tech explosion to one of our most significant economic generators, which is the hospitality industry and i think we're going to have some breaking news this morning, if i can call it that. an
, the economy will stop. we did a major outreach. we trained an outreach team, who went to every community meeting, to educate people on how bad the crisis was. not only did i tell people that we'd have to raise rates, i told them we'd have to tear up the city to repair this infrastructure. man: you can't simply say, "i won't use any water, it's too expensive." we have about 25% of our population that's at or below the poverty line, so you have to look at rate structures that are tiered so the people can pay their bills. franklin: we would love to have something like 75% federal money. we do get some federal aid and we are thankful, but on the other hand, we're paying for this primarily with new rates. we have increased our rates to among the highest in america. but not nearly as much as if we hadn't passed a one-cent sales tax dedicated to water and sewer infrastructure. hunter: that sales tax counts for about a third of the revenue of the department right now. franklin: we got 75% of the voters to agree to tax themselves so that their children and their children's children could have cle
time. the point i was making, people were terrified. because it seemed like the economy had no bottom and the banks were going down and there was no federal deposit dollars. so imagine a time when we actually had a president who told us we should be courageous rather than trafficked in fear. to his own advantage. there's been a long war on the new deal. it was when roosevelt got started. almost immediately, the more than great realized the lengths he was willing to go. at the beginning, roosevelt didn't understand how far he was going to go. the dupont family and the ones that set up the american liberty league. that was successful because they have unlimited amounts of money. there were so popular, they were not able to stop it. they began to finance right-wing think tanks. they have been successful to the university of chicago economics department and notable fraud such as milton freed man. the idea of neoliberalism is there should be massive, selective tax cuts. margaret thatcher it is there is no alternative. of course that's absurd. there was an alternative. we have to connect th
lifestyles and making the planet safer, and in our increasingly accelerated economy where every minute counts, they don't want to be waiting around for someone to pick them up and circling for parking, they want an option that's faster and more affordable and more convenient and graenbacker greener and as we can see, our city's leadership feels the same way. we are today opening the world's first network of shared electric scooters that you can activate with your smart phone and your phone, it's not just a key to the scooters, it's really a key to the city, it brings everything in the city closer to you, it opens up new neighborhoods that you may not have gone to before and it makes the places you get to every day more fun to get to. for those of us who ride, life before scoot is sort of like life before mobile phones, once you have a short-cut to anywhere in the city in your pocket, you don't really want to go back, so we give you scoot, the world's first network of shared electric scooters and the perfect mode of transportation for the city that leads the world in what's coming next. thank
, and the economy. without it, things simply can't exist. woman: we have good health in this country, in part, because we have clean water. and we shouldn't forget that, and we shouldn't take it for granted. melosi: in the late 19th century, serious waterborne disease epidemics were having devastating effects. roy: but then, in the early 1900s, we began to treat our water. and since then, we've seen a rapid decline in the incidence of waterborne disease. narrator: most cities treat drinking water through filtration, chlorination, and sometimes ozonation to kill pathogens in the source supply. these are complex treatment plants that cost millions of dollars to operate, but are necessary for our wellbeing. the treatment of drinking water has been called one of the greatest public health achievements of the last century. the water infrastructure itself protects the treated water until it comes out of our taps. it's been since 1911, since we had an outbreak of cholera or typhoid in the united states. but that doesn't mean that it can't happen. it can happen. if we aren't on our guard all the time
conviction, especially in a down economy, someone with a felony has great difficulty even accessing 5 a job that pays minimum wage. putting these felony convictions to a whole population of young people, we really perpetuate a chronic underclass which benefits none of us. and then of course there's the inequity in the criminal justice system. even though we can show that drug use rates are quite similar in all different ethnic communities and african-americans are 13 times greater likelihood of being convicted of a felony of simple possession. then of course there's also the savings that we could experience, nonpartisan, independent legislative analyst office has determined that there would be $159 million annually of savings at the county level, plus another $65 million annually in savings at the state level. and our bill would direct a portion of that savings to drug treatment programs so that we can, like these 13 other states, have better outcomes, safer communities. i of course have to thank the sponsors of our bill, and we have a number of them, the h.l.u. which has been a champion an
parts of the economy, the consumer, the investment and the government. the only reason thing that has grown on a rapid rate is the government. the government gets their revenues through taxation or borrowing money. the problem is the regulations are hurting small businesses. 2/3 of all jobs are created by small business which are considered -- chapter s corporations and less than $250,000 killing all of the regulations and kill the incentive. the government doesn't produce anything. it's the private sector that produces the wealth and the opportunity. get the government off the back through regulations and taxation and you will see the city once again be vibrant. i'm telling you it's taxation and regulations. i have two successful businesses. i would not open another one in san francisco. i would not. >> thank you. mr. yee. >> here's the four things i would do to create jobs. number one, help the small businesses with a one stot shop approach. ocean avenue had a fire. nine businesses had a fire and the mayor came and if he could do that one time we could do that all the tim
that is largest faces us in san francisco are the economy and there are two parts to that and creating jobs and trying to get an economy going that is sustainable and can take care of the unfunded liabilities that we have that are so large. we have $323 million in unfunded liabilities for our health care, and i agree with him again on the pension issue. we absolutely have to do something about it. what i would imagine what we have to do is examine whether or not we need to find benefits or contributions, maybe we need people to retire at a later age, whether people continue to retire and have the pay at $300,000 rather than 150. >> thank you sir. ms. gavin. >> for me the issue in regards to policy that i think many of us know is malfeasance and corruption at city hall. i think that the back room deals that city hall is doing adversely impacts every person in this room. i don't know if you are aware we have not had a sunshine committee in the past four months, and sunshine gives all the right to redress government and it's our open government that you the voters have voted for so for fo
. that is a gift economy. it is predicated on the idea that some things have an unconditional value. you cannot put a price on it. we just said, everything is a gift in our city. you cannot buy or sell anything. there is no advertising. you are not surrounded by this nattering pandemonium of commercial messages, which is so relentless. and lo and behold, we discovered, had a certain point in a community, when everyone is giving, -- people began to have experiences that were revelatory. they began to feel like they were in touch with that unconditional reality, which perhaps in their youth they identified as their life's goal. it creates a world in which -- just saturated with meaningful encounter. and it seems to have been contagious because people have now left our event and they have left our world and they continued to do activities. they did not go to a festival and say their appetite. they came back and tried to change their world. that is why we are starting this burning man project. we think there is a law that we can do together. try it sometime. try living for eight days without buying, se
of burning man in gerlach. the school is closing down because they do not have any kids. the economy has been based on mining. there are some tourists that come through. hunters. some of our people come through and leave money in their wake. a little town like that does not know how to make money. but they have learned in certain ways. we have made significant charitable contributions. i do not want to great -- take much credit for this, but we are helping to keep them alive. the thing about our event, we do not do commercial things at the event. it spreads out the economic development to our neighbors. the piutes down the road are now doing in the in taco stands now and we know them. there was the day when we were considered scary, coming from san francisco, you know. it is much easier to break into a big city. but we are well accepted and respected because we talk straight with everyone and we have benefited everyone. >> one more question and then one final question for you. >> something my friends have talked about is this kind of bipolar attitude of what it takes to look like a burner. it
in the city going on about the shared economy. the new economy, where we're sharing things and which is trumping ownership and making access to the major thing rather than ownership. that is exciting to me. in fact,, you know, i have to say, i was really enthralled yesterday when jack dorsey said, it's maybe more about the revolutionary approach that we're doing with government, with social services, with the way we communicate. i want that revolution. i'm a young guy, too, and i remember, we used the word "revolution." i [wa*-pd/] want to use in a technology context. >> you were probably smoking positive when you used it back then. [ laughter ] >> i didn't inhale. >> revolution -- okay. i think the key thing to know is the big party next month, it's innovate month next month. huge open house with all the tech companies. go to innovatesf.com and you can sign up. so that sounds like a lot of fun and there is the sf city, which is separate. and this is more, it seems like it's more a program to get the big and small tech companies actively participating in creating new jobs at a
housing for these individuals but not to keep going back to the economy but one solution is improve the economy so we can improve these people's lives. thank you. >> thank you. >> l the homeless problem it's very, very interesting because you know some cities don't -- i think one of the reasons we do have a problem is because of the wonderful social services that we have here in this city and unfortunately as someone who has sat on several committees it's disheartening that just across the east bay, even if you go to oakland, it changes drastically and i think it's one of the reasons people come to san francisco. do they all live here? absolutely not. and i think we have to get tough with this issue and the housing authority truly needs some restructuring, so that they can do their mandate which is to house people because that's another issue, but there is money missing there, so i think we have to be tough with that and it's like tough love but because we do care and it's going have to be dealt with. thank you. >> thank you. >> yes. well, homelessness has been a major problem f
was the foundation of the economy. and >> anything that touched on the possibility of prohibition was greatly and popular. >> the first campaign was a great effort, but not a success. >> the war was not over. less than one decade later, a graphic protests brought new life to the movement. >> women's suffrage, the republican convention in oakland, this time it was the private sector response. 300 marched down the streets of the convention center. women were entitled to be here. >> joining together for another campaign. >> women opened a club in san francisco. it was called the votes for women club. if she could get the shopkeepers to have lunch, she could get them to be heard literature. the lunch room was a tremendous success. >> it was the way that people thought about women willing to fight for a successful campaign. what happened was, the social transformation increase the boundary of what was possible, out word. >> there were parades and rallies, door to door candidacies, reaching every voter in the state. >> the eyes of the nation were on california in 1911, when we all voted. it was the
and our economy. it will take the right perspective of leadership from the mayor's office to make those events be able to happen. >> [unintelligible] [applause] >> i am very sorry that we lost some of these events. i'm sure they added to cultural diversity. i do know that looking at the board, there are 280 events in a given year. street fairs, hip-hop, promotional events. there is only so much that we can do. we have to make sure that every event has enough personnel to keep it safe. be it the security plan, officers, or police officers. that is one thing i failed to mention earlier. paramount to training for an event that has enough people to prevent anything disastrous from occurring, you never know what can be prevented, because you never know what you can stop from happening. you never know if people have enough resources to make sure they do not have a problem. >> down to the last few questions, we are running out of time. >> let's see how quick we can get to it. >> ok. >> we will be really fast. i commend the police department. for those of us in the entertainment industry, we ha
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 77 (some duplicates have been removed)